PoetryIssue 15 | June 2012

Two Excerpts by Anne Germanacos

Jerusalem, Out the Window - II

Nihad, the taxi driver, is late.
When her cellphone rings, she shouts: Wayn-ak?!

*

They stop and he buys a small bag of fresh garbanzos, which they eat, popping them from the thin green shell, as he drives the long way around to avoid long lines at the main checkpoint.

*
Re-wiring the religious instinct, mind by mind, synapse by synapse?

*
She reads that wolves turned dog by learning to be nice.

*
The next level of domestication?

*
Less tongue-tied than mute—she can’t think.

*

A form of reform. Resuscitation?

*

Neglecting the children?

*
How to be the society that forms (while also being the society that is formed)?

*

You: background presence as she tries to think this through.

*

This is where Freud and politics come together: a small revolution—a revelation.

*

Ditch religion’s accoutrements while utilizing its blood?

*
(always red)

*

Religion’s plumbing, science’s wiring.
(liquid heart, electric brain)

*

Maybe a version of science, but it always comes back to heart-to-heart.

*

Everyone picking apples from the same tree, biting into them raw.
Despite different words, doesn’t an apple taste the same to all mouths?
(You can only assume.)

*

Another difficult night.
Tears, etc.

*

On a high mountain in the West Bank, south of Bethlehem, they break bread with Palestinians and Jews, a dog scares a woman, good people receive flowers and words of praise for their generosity and bravery.

*

She believes she may understand a killer better than she understands someone who does the kind of good that truly changes the world.

*

Achieve sainthood by writing oneself into steam or a snowflake?

*

Good instincts on where to put the money.

*

Not holy, she doesn’t belong in the holy land.

*

(holey)

*

moth-eaten?

*

Peace-makers?
World-changers?
Civilization-tweakers?

*

Palm trees—she sees the sea.

*

They’re talking about non-violent transformation of conflict.
Do you urge conflict toward resolution? Do you stir it up? (What are your ulterior motives?)

*

(the tortured goose’s liver: a food for hardly starving humans)

*

The way you mark and handle your days, what you can adequately hold in the palm of a hand.

*

bit, inch, pound, minute
Crease?

*
The world is supposed to end today. In Manhattan, it’s gorgeous.

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About the author

Anne Germanacos and her husband divide their time between San Francisco and Crete. Her work has appeared in over seventy literary journals and anthologies. Read her collection of short stories, In the Time of the Girls,  published by BOA Editions in 2010. Or visit her here.

Read our current issue:

Poetry

Two poems by Anne Babson
Vignette, Townhouse, 9 a.m. by Troy Cunio
Night Becomes Day Over the West by Megan Foley
Yukon River Aurora by D. B. Goman
Two Poems by David Havird
Cretan Love Letter by Emily Linstrom
Holland by Rick Mullin
Fear in Kenya by Kristina Pfleegor
The Lounge Lizard by Ed Shacklee
Two Poems by Sarah J. Sloat
Night Flight by Vicki Stannard
Koinonia Farms by Alina Stefanescu
Thessaloniki, Four a.m. by Anastasia Vassos
Imaginary Oceans by Jason Warren
Two Poems by F. J. Williams

Postcard prose

It’s Salty by Kelly Hill

Travel notes

Anchorage in the Great Land by Karen Benning
The Value of Small Money by Megan Hallinan
Screensaver by Sandra Larson
Thirty Cents by Tommy McAree
Gokarna by Kate McCahill
Going Places by Rachel Miller-Howard
Susanville CA: Notes From The Road by Susan Volchok