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PoetryIssue 3 | February 2009

Four Poems by Amy MacLennan

To the Elevator Engineers

The ‘scrapers are taller
and your job (a dance
of physics and design) is to make
our elevators fly.
I know constraints of cement
and metal don’t allow
much slack. Still,
the chambers rise,
flaunting gravity, slicing air.
And you do know the limits.
Our plunge through floors
must be stopped. Velocity,
after all, is fixed.
But do you dream of endless speed?
I think you would hurl us
through those buildings, streaking
higher and faster
until our eardrums snap,
no matter the pressure
or the cost. The worries
rush to my head
every time the double doors
hush shut. How much
do you love your shafts
of space? How far would you go
to have your cables hum?

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About the author

Amy MacLennan loves traveling to places like Andorra, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg and Talent, Oregon (which has the best curried tuna salad sandwich ever). Amy’s work has been published or is forthcoming in Cimarron Review, Folio, Hayden’s Ferry ReviewLinebreak, Pearl, Rattle and River Styx. Her poems are forthcoming in the anthologies Not a Muse and Eating Her Wedding Dress: A Collection of Clothing Poems.

Read our current issue:

Poetry

Three poems by Emma Aprile
Bulgarian Pantoum by Aileen Bassis
When You Get There by Kate Bernadette Benedict
To Get to Trondheimsfjord by Sue Chenette
The New Place by Sadie Ducet
A Funeral in Zarra by Joe Evans
Port Cities and Pantries by Christine Jones
Boston Graveyards by David Landrum
Morgan’s by Sean J Mahoney
Rats by Alexander Motyl
Tell Me The Road by Michael Pearce
Walls in Warsaw by Michael Sarnowski
Words I have traveled, sadly beyond by Janice D. Soderling
Pale Blues by Lynne Thompson

Postcard prose

Postcard by Marc Harshman
How to Cross the Widest Highway in the World by Maryann Ullmann