PoetryIssue 03 | February 2009

Four Poems by Amy MacLennan

To the Elevator Engineers

The ‘scrapers are taller
and your job (a dance
of physics and design) is to make
our elevators fly.
I know constraints of cement
and metal don’t allow
much slack. Still,
the chambers rise,
flaunting gravity, slicing air.
And you do know the limits.
Our plunge through floors
must be stopped. Velocity,
after all, is fixed.
But do you dream of endless speed?
I think you would hurl us
through those buildings, streaking
higher and faster
until our eardrums snap,
no matter the pressure
or the cost. The worries
rush to my head
every time the double doors
hush shut. How much
do you love your shafts
of space? How far would you go
to have your cables hum?

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About the author

Amy MacLennan loves traveling to places like Andorra, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg and Talent, Oregon (which has the best curried tuna salad sandwich ever). Amy’s work has been published or is forthcoming in Cimarron Review, Folio, Hayden’s Ferry ReviewLinebreak, Pearl, Rattle and River Styx. Her poems are forthcoming in the anthologies Not a Muse and Eating Her Wedding Dress: A Collection of Clothing Poems.

Read our current issue:

Poetry

Two poems by Bonnie Bishop
Outside Ngaoundere by Aaron Brown
Watershed by Catherine Chandler
1955-D and 1945-S by Craig Cotter
Hyacinth by Dylan Crawford
Strays by Judy Darley
Freedom Fries by Krista Genevieve Farris
City Lights, Dirty Window by Janna Layton
The Road to Managua by Wilda Morris
Edinburgh, Alone by Stephanie Papa
Two poems by Eugenia Hepworth Petty
Four poems by Christine Potter
Next to the River by Jeremy Radin
Another Art by Susanna Rich
Five poems from Shoshauna Shy
Three poems by R L Swihart
Two poems by Rimas Uzgiris

Postcard prose

Gritsev Calls by Jeremy Radin
The Last Gentleman by Eldon Reishus

Travel notes

The Pond by Ariana Nadia Nash
So There They Were at the Beach Again, Looking Around by Janice D. Soderling