Poetry - Issue 22 | April 2015

The Road to Managua

by Wilda


Road to Managua, 1997

We cross the border from Costa Rica
too late. Ignoring warnings to drive
Nicaraguan roads only by daylight,
we press North, meet no revolutionaries,
only passport checks, pot holes,
large patches of paving
which have surrendered to rain,
and labourers running graders,
pouring asphalt. Night has painted
the road to Managua. Great fields
of darkness stretching out
between dimly lit homes and shops.
Ebony caverns under trees. It’s so dark
we catch no glimpse of Lake Nicaragua,
larger than the island of Puerto Rico. 
Asleep in the fields, Brahman cows
look like grey boulders in the landscape
often black as Nicaraguan grackles. 
We see nothing but dark silhouettes
until headlights hit Flamboyant trees,
momentary canopies of scarlet flame.


About the author

Wilda Morris is widely published in print and on the web. She has had the good fortune of travelling in the U.S., Europe, Asia, the Middle East and Latin America—but not nearly as much as she would like. Read her book, Szechuan Shrimp and Fortune Cookies: Poems from a Chinese Restaurant, published by RWG Press.

More in the archive »